Georgia’s new voter regulations: To prevent fraud or to suppress the vote

By Mary Kelly No comments

Just to be clear, I am 100% against voter fraud. I do not condone corruption or lies in my personal relationships, in my business relationships, or in the government under which I live, even if the fraud and lies might benefit me at the time they are espoused. 

Under the current voter regulations in Georgia (or what they were before this new law), there were already regulations in place to prevent voter fraud. Therefore, I am suggesting that the Georgia regulations were so restrictive before this new law that if a person committed voter fraud, they would be caught, prosecuted, and elections would be invalidated if fraud were found to be in a case where a candidate lost because of the fraud. I am suggesting that the new law will do nothing to prevent voter fraud. It will only serve to make it harder for law abiding, decent citizens to vote, especially for certain people in certain demographics.

In fact, among the cases that were referred to prosecutors in Georgia after the November 20, 2020, general election, some of which dated back several years, wherein four were instances of felons attempting to vote, four were non-citizens attempting to vote, and one was a case of lost ballots in the 2020 general election (which didn’t change the outcome of the contested presidential election), the Secretary of State Raffensperger said that “Election fraud is not tolerated in Georgia. When there is evidence of it, the people responsible face prosecution. Georgia has multiple safeguards in place that allow our team of investigators to discover fraudulent voting. They worked to catch the wrongdoing in these cases, and they maintain the security of Georgia elections. (U.S. News, 2021)” Raffensperger said this of the Georgia voter regulations as they were before the March 2021 change in the law. 

According to the Heritage Foundation’s database on Georgia, the last voter fraud conviction in the state (in which all candidates were Republican) was in Georgia’s 28th House District and concerned out-of district voters attempting to vote. “Though individuals were not prosecuted, this northeastern Georgia district faced three elections in the same year between the same Republican candidates (no Democrats ran). In the end, the incumbent lost to challenger Chris Erwin. Source: on-ajc.com/2P53Meg, on-ajc.com/2ZmXBpG, on-ajc.com/2HjZMjJ” (Voter Fraud Map: Election Fraud Database, The Heritage Foundation). That’s it!

Other statistics reported by the Heritage Foundation show voter fraud only in state and local elections, and the most current dates of the most voter fraud reported was in 2018. In fact, in my review of the vast amount of data in the Heritage Foundation database posted on their website, I am only finding data of cases in state and local elections. (Maybe I am missing something.) 

Let’s look at Texas. Texas has a lot more voter fraud cases than other states. (See the Voter Fraud Map in the references below). And with the large amount of voter fraud in Texas over the years, our previous president, Trump, who was contesting his lost the election was not challenging the election results in Texas (maybe because he won there). Trump’s BIG LIE that he actually won the election and it was stolen from him without any proof that fraud actually caused him to lose did not work to overturn the result of President Biden’s win. However, it did lead to many states, other than my own state of Georgia of which is my main concern, proposing new voter restrictions in which I suggest are voter suppression regulations, not voter fraud prevention regulations.

My sole purpose here is to oppose voter suppression. And I believe that the law just passed in Georgia is to achieve the Republican party’s attempt to suppress the vote of certain voters of certain demographics. If I could conclude that Georgia passed this new voter restriction law to help eliminate voter fraud, I would be all for it. But in my opinion, that is not the case. In my opinion, it is pure and simple voter suppression.

References:

U.S. News & World Report. (n.d.). Georgia: Potential Vote Fraud Case Handed to Prosecutors. U.S. News & World Report. https://www.usnews.com/news/politics/articles/2021-02-11/georgia-potential-vote-fraud-case-handed-to-prosecutors.

Georgia voter fraud “Also among the cases being referred to prosecutors, some of which date back several years: Four instances of felons voting or registering to vote; four cases of non-citizens voting or registering to vote; and one case of misplaced ballots during the 2020 general election, which didn’t change the outcome, Raffensperger said in a statement. “Election fraud is not tolerated in Georgia. When there is evidence of it, the people responsible face prosecution,” said Raffensperger, chairman of the five-member election board. “Georgia has multiple safeguards in place that allow our team of investigators to discover fraudulent voting,” he said. “They worked to catch the wrongdoing in these cases, and they maintain the security of Georgia elections.””


Voter Fraud Map: Election Fraud Database. The Heritage Foundation. (n.d.). https://www.heritage.org/voterfraud/search?combine=&state=TX&year=2019&case_type=All&fraud_type=All.

Texas voter fraud – Most recent conviction was in 2019 and here it is: “Charles Nathan Jackson Charles Nathan Jackson, of Tarrant County, forged the name of a stranger, Mardene Hickerson, on an application for an early voting ballot. Jackson pleaded guilty to providing false information on a voting application, a felony, as part of a plea deal to avoid an enhancement for previous drug and theft offenses. He was sentenced to 10 days in jail, and was given credit for time already served. Source: bit.ly/2YNqBry, bit.ly/2MeoOF9”


Voter Fraud Map: Election Fraud Database. The Heritage Foundation. (n.d.). https://www.heritage.org/voterfraud/search?state=GA&combine=&year=&case_type=All&fraud_type=All&page=1.

Georgia voter fraud _ last voter fraud conviction in Georgia, all of candidates were Republican: “Georgia’s 28th House District The 2018 election for Georgia’s 28th House district was overturned twice by Senior Superior Court Judge David Sweat because some out-of-district voters submitted ballots, some voters moved out of the district between the first and second runoff elections, and there was at least one instance of duplicate voting. Though individuals were not prosecuted, this northeastern Georgia district faced three elections in the same year between the same Republican candidates (no Democrats ran). In the end, the incumbent lost to challenger Chris Erwin. Source: on-ajc.com/2P53Meg, on-ajc.com/2ZmXBpG, on-ajc.com/2HjZMjJ”

by Mary Kelly
3/28/2021